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Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives
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Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives

  • ZA COM MR-AAO
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The international movement of solidarity with the struggle for freedom in South Africa was arguably the biggest social movement the world has seen. Virtually every country in the world has a history of anti-apartheid activity, in diverse forms. In many countries, anti-apartheid activities were linked (formally or informally) with local struggles against oppression of many kinds. Most anti-apartheid movements (AAMs) did not restrict their activities to South Africa, but supported liberation movements in Southern Africa more broadly. Besides individual countries, a range of regional and international organisations added their voices to the struggles against apartheid.

What follows is an overview of some of the extant archival records of this extraordinary history. It is a first step towards a more comprehensive picture; it is at this point but a marker.

Broadcasters for Radio Freedom [Omroep voor Radio Freedom]

The OvRF started in 1982 on the initiative of the AABN and mobilised people in the broadcasting sector to support Radio Freedom, the radio station of the ANC. Their aim being to raise financial support to train and equip several broadcasting stations for Radio Freedom. The organisation operated until 1995.

World University Service - Denmark [Solidaritet og Bistand]

The World University Service Denmark (WUS-D) started in 1966 as part of WUS International. It became independent in 1970. It started its solidarity activities in 1966 and became a member of the Anti-Apartheid Committee. It supported the liberation movements in Southern Africa. It distributed funds to the South African Committee for Higher Education (SACHED) and other bursary programmes. WUS continues its activities now as IBIS.

World Gold Commission

The World Gold Commission (WGC) was founded in 1988 to promote worldwide sanctions against South African gold sales. It received financial support from the UN Centre Against Apartheid and was backed by the AAM and the liberation movements. It was active in information dissemination and the presentation of evidence to international bodies.

World Campaign against Military and Nuclear Collaboration with South Africa

The World Campaign started in 1977/78 on the initiative of the AAM and the patronage of President Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, and was supported by the Special Committee of the UN. It monitored and strengthened the arms embargo against South Africa and exposed military collaborations. It worked closely with the special committee. In the 1980s, it lobbied for expulsion of South Africa from the International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA). Abdul Minty was the Director from 1979 to 1994.

Working Group Woman, Church, Twothirds World [Werkgroep Vrouw, Kerk, Tweederde Wereld]

VKW was founded in 1976 by representatives from Christian women’s organisations and continued to operate till 1991. It was a solidarity organisation with women in developing countries and encouraged women in the Netherlands to be active for change. It had a special working group on South Africa and worked especially on practical support to women’s organisations in South Africa and boycott campaigns.

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 3]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 2]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Working Group Kairos [Werkgroep Kairos] (Kairos Study Group) : [Part 1]

The Working Group Kairos was founded in 1970 in support of the Christian Institute in South Africa. Its main focus was on human rights violations and to raise support for sanctions and disinvestments and campaigned against Shell. It worked especially in the Christian community in the Netherlands and was instrumental in the foundation of the Shipping Research Bureau (SRB). It was renamed Stichting Kairos (Kairos Foundation), date unknown.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, New Zealand Section

In December 1916, a New Zealand branch of WILPF was established in Auckland. Branches in other cities were soon organised. In 1981 WILPF NZ organised a Women Against the Tour march in Auckland. Seven hundred people took part and 550 signed a petition, urging that the South African rugby team’s tour of NZ be cancelled. WILPF NZ members also took part in protests held when the tour went ahead. In 1989 the section’s name was officially changed to WILPF Aotearoa.

Women’s Union of the Dutch Labour Party [Vrouwenbond Partij van de Arbeid] : [Part 2]

The Women’s Union started its activities in 1946 as the women’s union of the political party PvdA. In 1969 the Women's Union changed its name to Women's Contact. It was renamed the Red Women (Rooie Vrouwen) in 1975. They participated in campaigns of the national AAMs as well as Amnesty International Netherlands.

Women’s Union of the Dutch Labour Party [Vrouwenbond Partij van de Arbeid] : [Part 1]

The Women’s Union started its activities in 1946 as the women’s union of the political party PvdA. In 1969 the Women's Union changed its name to Women's Contact. It was renamed the Red Women (Rooie Vrouwen) in 1975. They participated in campaigns of the national AAMs as well as Amnesty International Netherlands.

Women against Apartheid - Frankfurt [Frauen gegen Apartheid - Frankfurt] : [Part 2]

This was a local organisation of women in Frankfurt which formed part of the national Women against Apartheid organisation. Its activities included a boycott campaign against the Krugerrand gold coin and campaigns against banks making loans to South Africa. It also participated in the Outspan fruit boycott, and worked in schools.

Women against Apartheid - Frankfurt [Frauen gegen Apartheid - Frankfurt] : [Part 1]

This was a local organisation of women in Frankfurt which formed part of the national Women against Apartheid organisation. Its activities included a boycott campaign against the Krugerrand gold coin and campaigns against banks making loans to South Africa. It also participated in the Outspan fruit boycott, and worked in schools.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 3]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 2]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

William Julius Henry 'Joe' Harris : [Part 1]

WJH (Joe) Harris was a carpenter and member of the Queensland branch of the Building Workers' Industrial Union of Australia. He became a freelance journalist writing on the history of the labour movement. He played an active role in, amongst others, the campaign against the South African Springbok Rugby tour.

We and Them Foundation [Stichting Wij en Zij]

The We and Them Foundation was founded in 1982 by the International Development Cooperation of the Federation of Dutch Trade Unions (FNV). Besides direct support to trade unions in South Africa, the foundation also participated in campaigns of the national AAMs. It changed its name to FNV Mondiaal in 1997.

Washington Office on Africa

The Washington Office on Africa (WOA) was founded in 1972 to support the movement for freedom from white-minority rule in southern Africa. It was initially sponsored by five organisations including the American Committee on Africa. It grew out of the Washington Office of the American Committee on Africa, which was established in 1967. Churches and labour unions supported the organisation to work with the Congress on Southern Africa legislation. The Washington Office on Africa Educational Fund (WOAEF) was established as the educational division of WOA.

War Resisters’ International

The WRI was established in 1921 as an organisation against war. Its members refuse to support war or preparations for war in various forms, such as refusing to engage in military service, pay taxes to support the military, etc. It is fundamentally committed to nonviolent action as a form of social struggle. WRI has provided training in nonviolence and held a number of international conferences. WRI was involved with solidarity work with the End Conscription Campaign and the Conscientious Objectors Support Group, which was formally affiliated with WRI.

Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The Welsh Committee of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) was established in 1981 and adopted the name The Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement (WAAM). WAAM operated as a national movement in Wales, with a clear Welsh identity. It was dissolved in 1994 following the first democratic elections in South Africa and its assets were transferred to Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) Wales, which continues to campaign and work for peace and democracy in Southern Africa.

Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The Welsh Committee of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) was established in 1981 and adopted the name The Wales Anti-Apartheid Movement (WAAM). WAAM operated as a national movement in Wales, with a clear Welsh identity. It was dissolved in 1994 following the first democratic elections in South Africa and its assets were transferred to Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA) Wales, which continues to campaign and work for peace and democracy in Southern Africa.

Uppsala Africa Group

The UAG grew out of the Uppsala South Africa Committee (USAK) which was started in 1963 by the Uppsala Student Union. It reorganised itself in 1968 and became UAG which operated till 1994. It developed into a general membership organisations which also supported the armed struggle.

University of the Western Cape, Robben Island Museum / Mayibuye Archives

The archives of the Robben Island Museum are housed at and managed by the UWC/RIM Mayibuye Archives. Some are located on the island, but the bulk is at the UWC Campus in Belville, Cape Town. The archives hold a large collection of artifacts, documents, photographs, artworks, personal papers and audio-visual materials. Although the emphasis is on South African organisations and people, many AAMs (national and international) and other international anti-apartheid organisations are represented in the collection. The IDAF, for example, deposited its entire archive at UWC/RIM Mayibuye.

United Nations Special Committee against Apartheid

The Special Committee against Apartheid was set up in 1962 and operated till 1994. Initially named the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, the name was shortened in 1971 to Special Committee on Apartheid and changed again in 1974 to Special Committee against Apartheid. One of its main roles was to secure effective, mandatory sanctions against South Africa. It worked closely together with the OAU, the liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

The UNHCR is the UN agency for the protection and care of refugees. It started to operate in 1950, based on the Geneva Refugee Convention. Besides playing a role in improving the status of refugees through international agreements and measures at national level, it also works at a practical level. It supported various anti-apartheid liberation movements.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 4]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 3]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 2]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations Centre against Apartheid : [Part 1]

The Centre against Apartheid started in 1976 in the UN Secretariat under the name Unit on Apartheid. Its role was to promote publicity against Apartheid and it worked under the guidance of the Special Committee and in cooperation with the Department of Public Information. During its existence, it published hundreds of posters, audio materials and documentary films. It organised art competitions and exhibitions. It had radio broadcasts to South Africa in several languages. It worked closely together with the liberation movements and the AAMs. Many of the documents published by the Centre were written by members of liberation movements and the AAMs.

United Nations

The UN is an international organisation that aims to facilitate cooperation in international law, security, economic development, social progress, human rights and achieving world peace. It was founded in 1945 and replaced the League of Nations. It has been concerned with the issue of racial discrimination since its beginning and racism became an important item on the United Nations agenda after African nations attained independence and after the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa in 1960. The Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1963), which led to the International Convention in 1965. It proclaimed the International Year for Action to Combat Racial Discrimination in 1971 and the three Decades for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination in 1973. Besides the specialised agencies on apartheid, several other agencies of the UN were also involved in anti-apartheid and solidarity activities.

Trevor Richards

Trevor Richards was national chairman of the Halt All Racist Tours (HART) movement from 1969-80, then its international secretary until 1985. He has also written extensively about the history of NZ sporting relations with apartheid South Africa.

TransAfrica

Transafrica was founded in 1977 as the African American Lobby on Africa and the Caribbean. It worked closely with the Congressional Black Caucus and was active in divestments, boycott and other campaigns. It organised and participated in sit-ins in the office of the South African ambassador in Washington, followed by demonstrations outside South African embassies and consulates, organised by what became the Free South Africa Movement (FSAM).

Trades Union Congress : [Part 2]

The TUC is a federation of trade unions in the UK which started in 1868. It gave direct support to unions in South Africa and was active in boycott campaigns nationally and internationally.

Trades Union Congress : [Part 1]

The TUC is a federation of trade unions in the UK which started in 1868. It gave direct support to unions in South Africa and was active in boycott campaigns nationally and internationally.

Thomas Oliver 'Tom' Newnham

Tom Newnham was a New Zealand political activist. He was involved in several causes, including attacking institutional racism in New Zealand, and opposing the 1981 Springbok Tour and apartheid in general. He was national president and secretary of the Citizens Association for Racial Equality (CARE) at various times.

The Road to Democracy in South Africa

'The Road to Democracy in South Africa' is a series of books published by the South African Democratic Education Trust (SADET). Volume 3 is dedicated to the International Solidarity movement and organisations. Volume 5 deals with the African Solidarity movement.

The Nordic Documentation on the Liberation Struggle in Southern Africa Project

This site provides archival lists of primary source materials that can be found at Nordic archival institutions, NGOs and archives of individuals who have been involved in the liberation struggles of Southern Africa. The website includes interviews, photographs, publications, posters and newspaper cuttings from 1960-1996. It also provides some archival materials in PDF format.

Terence McCaughey

Reverend Terence McCaughey is a Presbyterian minister, and served as president of the Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement. He is currently the president of Irish anti-war lobby group Peace and Neutrality Alliance (PANA), and is a former spokesman for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).

Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility : [Part 2]

The Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR) was established in 1975 as a coalition of Canadian Churches. It worked towards social responsibility in Canadian based corporations and financial institutions. It supported the South African Council of Churches (SACC) proposal for a code of business ethics for companies operating in South Africa. It campaigned strongly to end loans to the apartheid regime and approached shareholders to accomplish this. In 2001, TCCR became part of KAIROS Canada.

Task Force on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility : [Part 1]

The Task Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility (TCCR) was established in 1975 as a coalition of Canadian Churches. It worked towards social responsibility in Canadian based corporations and financial institutions. It supported the South African Council of Churches (SACC) proposal for a code of business ethics for companies operating in South Africa. It campaigned strongly to end loans to the apartheid regime and approached shareholders to accomplish this. In 2001, TCCR became part of KAIROS Canada.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 2]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 1]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 3]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 1]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swedish South Africa Committee [Svenska Sydafrikakommittén]

The SSAC was formed in 1961 as an umbrella organisation of NGOs to start campaigning for a consumer boycott of South African products. It pressured the Swedish government to apply sanctions and later supported the ANC’s armed struggle. The committee dominated the anti-apartheid work in Sweden during the 1960s but its activities decreased as other organisations became more active.

Swedish Labour Movement Archives and Library [Arbetarrörelsens arkiv och bibliotek]

The Labour Movement Archives and Library hold substantial collections of the Swedish labour movement from around the 1950s. It holds records from political parties and other organisations as well. It concentrates on archives of the central and Stockholm-based local organisations. It holds a big Africa collection.

Support Group Klaas de Jonge & Hélène Passtoors [Steungroep Klaas de Jonge & Hélène Passtoors]

The support group was formed when Dutch-Belgian couple De Jonge and Passtoors was arrested in South Africa in 1985 for smuggling weapons and explosives for the ANC into the country. De Jonge managed to seek refuge in the Dutch embassy in Pretoria, which caused a big diplomatic row. He stayed there for two years until he was exchanged with a South African prisoner. Passtoors was convicted of High Treason and imprisoned from 1985-1989. The support group, which campaigned for their release, closed down in 1989.

Support Group for the People of South Africa [Stödgruppen för Sydafrikas Folk]

The SSF started in 1974 and worked closely together with the Africa Groups of Sweden (AGS) and the Stockholm Africa Group. At that time the AGS was mainly involved with the former Portuguese colonies. It became a working group at the ANC office in Stockholm in 1979, and ceased to be an independent organisation in the same year.

State Archives, The Netherlands [Het Staatsarchief]

The State Archives collection focuses mainly on the Dutch squatter movement, and includes material related to the movement's activities against apartheid. The movement carried out radical actions against companies dealing with South Africa, and operated in a semi-underground manner. The archive is housed at the International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 6]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 5]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 4]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 3]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 2]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 1]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Southern African Development Coordination Conference

The Southern African Development Coordination Conference (SADCC), which was the forerunner of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), was formed in Lusaka, Zambia, on 1 April 1980. It grew from the Frontline States, an alliance of countries in Southern Africa formed in 1970 to aid the liberation movements in South Africa and Namibia and to form a front against apartheid. Some of the main goals of the SADCC were to lessen the dependency on apartheid South Africa and to introduce programmes and projects which would influence the Southern African region. It was renamed SADC in 1992.

Southern Africa Support Project

The SASP started in 1978 as a community-based organisation in Washington DC in support of the liberation struggles in Southern Africa. It gave political and material support to the liberation movements and was involved in fundraising and educational campaigns.

Southern Africa Liberation Committee

The SALC was a community organisation based at Michigan State University (MSU). It operated from 1973-1997, and was active at MSU and in the greater East Lansing area. It organised a number of successful educational and social action campaigns, and was very active in lobbying for divestment, consumer boycotts and no-loans to South Africa.

Southern Africa Defence and Aid Fund in Australia

The Southern Africa Defence and Aid Fund in Australia (SADAF) was founded in 1963 by a small group of South-African post-Sharpeville refugees and several interested Australians. SADAF’s main aims were to aid and defend the victims of unjust legislation and oppression in South Africa, including support for families and dependents of victims and to keep the conscience of the world alive to the issues at stake. SADAF was affiliated to the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). In 1981 SADAF was dissolved and reconvened as the Community Aid Abroad Southern Africa (CAASA). Like its predecessor, CAASA maintained close ties with Campaign against Racial Exploitation (CARE). CAASA folded in 1987.

Southampton Anti-Apartheid Group

The Southampton Anti-apartheid Group is perhaps best remembered for delivering a giant Barclays cheque to the local Barclays branch on 4 April 1979. The cheque was made payable ‘for bribery and corruption by the South African Government’ and signed ‘Connie Muldergate’. South African Information Minister Connie Mulder was forced to resign because he established a government slush fund to promote South Africa’s image overseas. SAAG was also involved in the boycott of South African imports, as well as the Shell and BP boycott organised by the national AAM in 1981.

South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee

The South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC) was formed in South Africa in 1962. SAN-ROC began operating from London when one of its founders, Dennis Brutus, went into exile in 1966. In 1970 Brutus moved to the United States, and SAN-ROC was then based in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Forerunners were the Committee for International Recognition, formed by non-racial sportsmen in 1955, and succeeded by the South African Sports Association (SASA) in 1958. SAN-ROC played a major role in South Africa being excluded from the Olympic Games in 1966, and from the entire Olympic movement in 1970.

South African History Archive

SAHA is a human rights archive located at Constitution Hill, Johannesburg. The Struggles for Justice Programme, though mainly concentrating on South African organisations and people, also contains materials of international AAMs.

South Africa/Namibia Association

The SA/NAM was founded in 1986 and worked until 1993 to co-ordinate development projects in South Africa and Namibia. In South Africa, most of the funds went to the Kagiso Trust. The funds mainly came from SA/NAM members, European NGOs and anti-apartheid organisations, as well as from the European Special Programme for Victims of Apartheid (ESP).

South Africa Contact [Sydafrika Kontakt]

South Africa Contact was founded in 1978 by several political parties, trade unions and other organisations to work against colonialism and oppression in Southern Africa. After the liberation of Angola, Mozambique and Zimbabwe it concentrated its activities towards establishing an economic and cultural boycott of South Africa.

Shipping Research Bureau : [Part 2]

The Shipping Research Bureau was a specialist organisation, mainly dealing with research into the oil trade with South Africa and alerting the world to breaches of the UN oil embargo. It pressured national governments to adopt sanctions against South Africa. It was founded by the Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika (KZA) and Working Group Kairos in 1980, and continued operating until 1995.

Shipping Research Bureau : [Part 1]

The Shipping Research Bureau was a specialist organisation, mainly dealing with research into the oil trade with South Africa and alerting the world to breaches of the UN oil embargo. It pressured national governments to adopt sanctions against South Africa. It was founded by the Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika (KZA) and Working Group Kairos in 1980, and continued operating until 1995.

Seafarer's Union

In December 1989, the Federated Cooks and Stewards of NZ, the NZ Seamen's Union and the North Shore Ferry Employees merged to form the NZ Seafarers' Union. The Maritime Union of New Zealand was formed in 2002 when the New Zealand Waterfront Workers’ Union and the New Zealand Seafarers’ Union joined together.

Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History

The Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History (RGASPI), formerly the Marx-Lenin Institute, was established in 1999 as a merger of two other archives, the Russian Centre for the Preservation and Study of Documents of Most Recent History and the Centre for the Preservation of Documents of Youth Organisations. RGASPI contains the archives of the Communist International and includes material about its relations with the Communist Party of South Africa.

Richard Albert Etheridge

Born in 1909 in Birmingham, Richard Albert Etheridge had a lifelong involvement with the Amalgamated Engineering Union. In 1940 he started work at the Austin Motor Co.'s Longbridge plant, and was elected shop steward in the following year. He was also elected secretary of the Austin AEU Shop Stewards' Committee. In 1946, Etheridge was elected to the AEU's Birmingham District Committee, remaining a member until 1965 when he was elected President of the newly-created Birmingham West District, a post he held until 1975. In 1963, and again from 1966 to 1974, he was elected an AEU to the annual Trades Union Congress. A lifelong supporter of the Communist Party, he helped formulate Party policy with regard to the motor industry, and stood as a candidate in the 1950 general election. From 1961 to 1973, Etheridge was a member of the Party's Executive Committee. He died in 1985.

Programme to Combat Racism : World Council of Churches : [Part 2]

The Programme to Combat Racism started in 1968 as part of the WCC Programme Unit on Justice and Service. Its aim was to develop policies and programmes contributing to the liberation of victims of racism. Much of its attention and focus was on southern Africa, especially apartheid and the divestment campaign. It established a special fund from which donations to liberation movements were made and to solidarity organisations around the world.

Programme to Combat Racism : World Council of Churches : [Part 1]

The Programme to Combat Racism started in 1968 as part of the WCC Programme Unit on Justice and Service. Its aim was to develop policies and programmes contributing to the liberation of victims of racism. Much of its attention and focus was on southern Africa, especially apartheid and the divestment campaign. It established a special fund from which donations to liberation movements were made and to solidarity organisations around the world.

Prexy Nesbitt : [Part 2]

Prexy Nesbitt is an activist and academic from Chicago who was active in the struggle to end apartheid and worked to end colonialism in Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia. He founded the Antioch Committee for a Free South Africa, which succeeded after a ten-year campaign to achieve the divestment of Antioch College’s holdings from companies involved with apartheid. Nesbitt worked for the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) where he coordinated the National Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa from 1976-1979. From 1979-1983 he was Program Director for the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches in Geneva. He has also worked for the Institute for Policy Studies, the American Friends Service Committee and Africa Action.

Prexy Nesbitt : [Part 1]

Prexy Nesbitt is an activist and academic from Chicago who was active in the struggle to end apartheid and worked to end colonialism in Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Namibia. He founded the Antioch Committee for a Free South Africa, which succeeded after a ten-year campaign to achieve the divestment of Antioch College’s holdings from companies involved with apartheid. Nesbitt worked for the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) where he coordinated the National Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa from 1976-1979. From 1979-1983 he was Program Director for the Program to Combat Racism of the World Council of Churches in Geneva. He has also worked for the Institute for Policy Studies, the American Friends Service Committee and Africa Action.

Political Archives : [Part 2]

The Political Archives website is the product of a project sponsored by the Vice-Chancellor's Development Fund (University of London) and run jointly by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICS) and the Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA). It aims to improve access to and use of their extensive collections of political ephemera. Southern Africa is particularly well represented, with materials from a wide variety of different political parties, trade unions and pressure groups.

Political Archives : [Part 1]

The Political Archives website is the product of a project sponsored by the Vice-Chancellor's Development Fund (University of London) and run jointly by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICS) and the Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA). It aims to improve access to and use of their extensive collections of political ephemera. Southern Africa is particularly well represented, with materials from a wide variety of different political parties, trade unions and pressure groups.

Polaroid Revolutionary Workers Movement

The Polaroid Revolutionary Workers Movement (PRWM) was formed in 1970 by two African American Polaroid employees, Ken Williams and Caroline Hunter, when they discovered that the company's products were being used by the South African government to create photographs for the passbooks that all Africans were required to carry.The PRWM demanded that the company stop all sales to South Africa until the end of apartheid.

Pieter Boersma

Pieter Boersma is an Amsterdam-based photographer who had worked with the national AAMs and the Association of European Parliamentarians for Africa (AWEPAA) for many years. He took photographs of demonstrations and conferences, and visited projects of the ANC in Africa. He also attended numerous international anti-apartheid conferences.

Peter Davis : Villon Films

Film producer and director Peter Davis was born and raised in England. He later emigrated to Sweden, and then North America. He became deeply involved in the anti-apartheid movement, and founded Villon Films in 1970. Davis has written, produced, and directed more than 70 documentaries.

Peace [Vrede]

Peace was a national organisation that operated from approximately 1971 to 1985. It participated in the boycott campaigns and the activities of the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (Vlaamse Anti-Apartheid Koalitie - VAAK) and Boycott Apartheid.

Oxfam Solidarity Belgium [Oxfam Solidariteit Belgi

Oxfam Solidarity Belgium started in 1964 as an organisation geared towards solidarity with struggles for self-determination. It was made up of three separate sections, and it was the Oxfam Solidarity section that joined anti-apartheid activities from around 1973 till 1994. Oxfam mainly joined campaigns organised by the Committee against Colonialism and Apartheid and the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (VAAK) but also organised its own demonstrations against apartheid. It was very active in the fruit boycott campaign and the campaigns against banks with ties with South Africa. It supported the Kagiso Trust Fund and the ANC office in Brussels.

Oxfam International

Oxfam International was formed in 1995 by a group of independent non-governmental organisations. The name 'Oxfam' comes from Oxford Committee for Famine Relief, founded in Britain in 1942. Oxfam International member NGOs aimed to work together for greater impact on the international stage to reduce poverty and injustice. They organised their own anti-apartheid campaigns, and also participated in campaigns organised by AAMs.

Organisation of Solidarity with the Peoples of Africa, Asia and Latin America [Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina] : [Part 6]

OSPAAAL was established following the Tricontinental Conference held in Havana, January 1966, to promote "solidarity with the Third World people's struggles, claims and most precious desires". The organisation supported struggles against colonialism and apartheid, and notably produced a large number of brightly coloured propaganda posters to promote its cause.

Organisation of Solidarity with the Peoples of Africa, Asia and Latin America [Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, Africa y América Latina] : [Part 5]

OSPAAAL was established following the Tricontinental Conference held in Havana, January 1966, to promote "solidarity with the Third World people's struggles, claims and most precious desires". The organisation supported struggles against colonialism and apartheid, and notably produced a large number of brightly coloured propaganda posters to promote its cause.
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