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Arrivals for the Mandela Trial

Mr. Nelson Mandela former Transvaal president of the banned African National Congress, appeared in court on charges of incitement and leaving South Africa illegally. The trial transferred from Johannesburg to Pretoria on security grounds. The trial was adjourned for a week to give Mr. Mandela time to appoint defense counsel. Mr Mandela was remanded in custody. Mr Mandela was dressed in tribal dress. Attending the trial was his wife, Mrs. Winnie Mandela and his sister, Ms Leabi Mandela. The courtroom packed with supporters of Mr. Mandela, Mr Mandela that his counsel was unable to appear for him because he was confined to Johannesburg under the suppression of Communism act. Mr. Mandela said the sudden transfer of the trial to Pretoria had deprived him of his attorney services. 17 October 1962

John Mendelson

Correspondence, circulars reports to South Africa including letter from the British Consulate- General in Johannesburg on the Rivonia treason trial (1963) letter from John Mendelson to David Astor regarding Nelson Mandela and his colleagues (1974).

Mendelson, John

Papers of Justice ( British Section of the International Commission of Jurists)

Country files compiled by Tom Sargant arranged by country and reflecting related aspect of justice and law in the British colonies and dependent territories. Events in South Africa are covered in some depth over three decades and the most file focuses on the Rivonia trial and opponents of Apartheid. The records detail a large proportion of the ANC leadership detained, including its president , Chief Albert Luthuli, Nelson Mandela and Walter Sisulu as well as other opponents of Apartheid such as Helen Joseph the secretary of the South African Women's Federation. Also includes schedule of the charges faced by the defendants in the first treason trail.

Sargant, Tom

Bernie Grant

Bernie Grant collection documents the concerns of numerous oppressed peoples of and diverse communities the material includes an official invitation and programme to the inauguration of Nelson Mandela, footage and newspaper articles.

Grant, Bernie

Africa Bureau : [Part 1]

The Africa Bureau was set up in 1952 by, amongst others, Mary Benson and Rev. Michael Scott, and operated until 1978. It was active in the area of international sanctions and worked with the AAM in the 1960s. It later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational Trust.

Africa Bureau : [Part 2]

The Africa Bureau was set up in 1952 by, amongst others, Mary Benson and Rev. Michael Scott, and operated until 1978. It was active in the area of international sanctions and worked with the AAM in the 1960s. It later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational Trust.

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 3]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 4]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 4]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 3]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Christian Aid : [Part 3]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

City of London Anti-Apartheid Group (City Group) : [Part 2]

The City of London Anti-Apartheid Group was a breakaway group of the national AAM, founded in 1982 by Norma Kitson, and allied to the Revolutionary Communist Group. City Group developed a close working relationship not only with the ANC and SWAPO, but also with the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), AZAPO, and Black Consciousness supporters. In 1985 City Group was expelled from the national AAM, and from 1986 - 1990 its supporters maintained a Non-Stop Picket outside the South African Embassy in Trafalgar Square calling for the release of Nelson Mandela. The City Group archives provide an opportunity to understand a different perspective on the international anti-apartheid movement.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 3]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

Hannah Stanton

Hannah Stanton was a missionary and anti-apartheid activist who worked in South Africa and the UK. Following the increased violence and activities of the South African police, culminating in the Sharpeville Massacre of 21 March 1960, she found herself under surveillance. On 30 March 1960 she was arrested and held without charge, and without access to a lawyer until 21 May 1960, when she was deported to the UK. During this time she was held at Pretoria Central Gaol, where she shared a cell with Helen Joseph. After her deportation she became involved in various anti-apartheid campaigns, including those of the AAM.

International Transport Workers’ Federation : [Part 1]

The International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) is an international trade union federation of transport workers' unions. The ITF was founded in London in 1886 by European Seafarers and Dockers’ union leaders who realised the need to organise internationally against strike breakers. The ITF represents transport workers at world level and promotes their interests through global campaigning and solidarity. It works for the advancement of fundamental human rights and trade union rights and opposes discrimination. The Reports on Africa contains reports on its activities, amongst others, in South Africa.

Justice

Justice, the British section of the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) was established in 1957 in response to the arrest of people in South Africa in 1956 (which led to the Treason Trial). It sent observers to the trial. It sees itself as an expert, independent body rather than a pressure group and its main aim is to observe the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by securing fair trials, especially political trials of opponents of apartheid.

Political Archives : [Part 1]

The Political Archives website is the product of a project sponsored by the Vice-Chancellor's Development Fund (University of London) and run jointly by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICS) and the Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA). It aims to improve access to and use of their extensive collections of political ephemera. Southern Africa is particularly well represented, with materials from a wide variety of different political parties, trade unions and pressure groups.

Unveiling of the Nelson Mandela statue, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on Nelson Mandela arriving at Parliament square in London for the unveiling of the statue crowds cheering. Speech by Richard Attenborough, speech by Wendy Woods remembers his late husband Donald Woods. Speech by Gordon Brown, Speech by Nelson Mandela informing the people about the 46664 concert in Hyde Park, dancing singing and applause when the statue is unveiled, Nelson Mandela departs.

Giant Media

46664 London Concert, 2007-2008, London: [Recorded Event]

Video on 46664 London Concert- Achmat Dangor in London working on finding accommodation for the Mandela grandchildren who will be attending the concert. Securing tickets for dignitaries the Mayor of London including the Kinnocks. Behind the scenes work with Tim Massey and artists who will be performing, planning and organising for the London concert

Giant Media

Press Conference on Goal for Africa held at the Metropolitan London 27 June 2008: [Recorded event]

Video on press conference annoucingthe gloabl kick off the Goal for Africa, the event was held at the Metropolitan, London. Goal for africa campaign is a global scoring goals for educating social development in Africa. Chris Vermeeren the creator of Goal for Africa Achmat Dangor CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation with Ali Campell and, Clarence Seedorf calling for support and to raise funds for Goal for Africa. Achmat presented with the Goal for Africa t.shirt for Madiba.

Giant Media

Mayibuye Archives, 1940s-1960s, South Africa: [Set of 52 still images]

Collection of historical photographs held by the Mayibuye Archives: Yusuf Dadoo and Joe Slovo in a march in London, 1963, in response to increasing repression against apartheid in South Africa and the arrest of Nelson Mandela and other comrades; Mandela with members of the National Liberation Front of Algeria in 1962; Mandela posing for a photo with Batshaka Cele, a relative of Winnie Madikizela Mandela.

Mayibuye Archives

Remarks of Honorable Nelson Mandela, Former South African President, at the launch of final report of World Commission on Dams : Beyond Freedom: Transforming "Ngalamadami" into "Sithi Sonke"

  • ZA COM MR-S-082
  • Item
  • 2000-11-16
  • Part of Speeches

The transcript on page one of the Transcript section comes from the South African Government Information Website. The transcript on page two of the transcript section is from the ANC website. It is assumed that page one was the version actually presented but this has not been confirmed.

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

South African Political Papers of His Honour Judge Kellock

The material includes fragments of the Rivonia Trial Transcript concerning the details of the charges; news sheets and press releases about the Rivonia Trial; a statement by Kellock on the Trial; information sheets on South African legislation; minutes and circulars from the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners. Other material includes Anti-Apartheid Movement correspondence, and national and executive committee meeting minutes for 1965 - 1966; correspondence relating to the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee and its officials; and papers relating to the Nyasaland emergency of 1959.

Judge Kellock, (formerly Mr. Thomas Oslaf Kellock, Q.C.) was Chairman of the National Committee of the Anti-Apartheid Movement in Britain from 1963-65. This group of papers is mostly concerned with the period when Mr. Kellock was sent to South Africa by Christian Action to act as an observer for the Defence and Aid Fund at the Rivonia Trial in 1964.

Kellock, Thomas Oslaf

Mandela Trials Papers

Photocopies of papers collected by Joel Joffe, lawyer acting for Nelson Mandela, relating to Mandela's trial in Pretoria (1962) and the Rivonia Trial (1963-1964); including Mandela's application to have the Pretoria trial postponed, October 1962; Mandela's address to the court in mitigation of the sentence of five years imprisonment, detailing his political commitment and activities in the African National Congress (ANC), November 1962; copy of the indictment in the Rivonia Trial, initial statement made by Mandela to his lawyers, giving details of his early life; notes by Mandela on his life and ANC association; copy of Mandela's statement from the dock, signed by Mandela, manuscript notes by Mandela to use if he were sentenced to death, and manuscript notes by Mandela referring to the tribal council called Imbizo.

Joffe, Joel

South African Trials

Transcripts of political cases.
Peripherally related to the Rivonia Trial is File 4: Inquest to establish cause of death of Looksmart Ngudle. It contains: transcript of complete proceedings. Pretoria, 21st Oct. 1963 - 23rd Dec. 1963. Looksmart Ngudle, a ninety-day detainee held under the Sabotage Act, was found dead, hanging in his cell at Pretoria Central Police Station, on September 5th, after 16 days in detention. He had been arrested in Cape Town and was found in possession of a firearm and some African National Congress leaflets. The four witnesses, held at the same time as Ngudle, said when cross-examined by the Defence that they had been tortured with electric shocks and severe beatings. One said that he was forced to sign a statement claiming that Ngudle was an important Umkonto we Sizwe leader (Ngudle was named in the Rivonia Trial as a co-conspirator). Each of the witnesses stated that Ngudle had told them that he was being tortured. The state claimed that Ngudle hanged himself because he had betrayed his comrades and had been told that he was going to be sentenced to death anyway. Further evidence of torture was ruled irrelevant: the court refused to accept the Defence's contention that torture (which the police denied) was a contributing factor to Ngudle's suicide. The hearing was adjourned.

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