Showing 496 results

Archival description
United Kingdom
Print preview View:

Mandela Gardens, in Calveley Street

It was renovated and its name changed to Millennium Square in 2000. On 30 April 2001 when Mandela received Freedom of the Ciy of Leeds, Mandela re-dedicated the city's Mandela Garden, which first opened in 1983 in support of South Africa's struggle for equality. The garden includes a bronze statue, entitled "both arms" by Kenneth Armitage.

Freedom of the City of Glasgow

  • ZA COM 2019-2-1-1-0441
  • Item
  • 4 August 1981
  • Part of For deletion

The Scroll was accepted on behalf of Mandela by Vice-President of Nigeria, Dr Ekwueme (Alex). Presented by Lord Provost Mr Michael Kelly. The scroll, known as the Burgess Ticket, was to be kept in Government House, Lagos and "when M gains M's freedom in I hope, the not too distant future, he will be able to come to Lagos to receive it"

Mary Benson Papers

Mainly correspondence between Benson and fellow South African activists and large amounts of newspaper cuttings collected by Benson relating to South Africa and the struggle against Apartheid.

Records related to the Rivonia Trial:
-Nelson Mandela’s statement from the dock at the Rivonia Trial (ICS6/5/3)
-Elias Motsoaledi's statement (ICS6/5/7)
- Correspondence, reports and statements about the treatment of political prisoners in South Africa, including reports by the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) and Amnesty International
- Papers related to Nelson Mandela’s imprisonment, collected by Benson when writing her biography of Mandela, "Nelson Mandela: the Man and the Movement."
- Correspondence between Mandela and Mary Benson. There is also correspondence between Benson and others, mainly related to Mandela and campaigns for his release from prison. Correspondents include Helen Suzman, Elinor Birley, Hilda Bernstein, Oliver Tambo, Winnie Mandela, Denis Healey and Ismail Ayob.
- Typed notes on Mandela and other prisoner
-News clippings concerning Mandela, mainly from British newspapers. Subjects covered in particular detail include the Rivonia Trial and campaigns for Mandela's release (ICS6/8)

Benson, Mary

African Writers' Club: BBC Africa Services Collection

Talk about the struggle of black people of South Africa living under apartheid. The speaker talks about the role of the African National Congress (ANC) in the fight for freedom. The names of many freedom fighters are listed. There is also a detailed discussion about the 'Rivonia Treason Trial'.

British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Rivonia Trial, South Africa, 1963-4: Nelson Mandela Dictabelt Dubbings

Dubbings of seven dictabelts loaned by the National Archives of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa, of court recordings made at the Court of Justice in Pretoria on 20 April 1964. The blue 'dictabelts' are a type of audio recording, developed by the Dictaphone company, which was mainly used in offices between the 1940s and the 1960s. The short broad plastic belts were capable of being flattened and posted but could not be wiped and reused. It appears that the whole Rivonia Trial was recorded on dictabelts in line with normal court procedure at the time. These dubbings comprise only the opening of the defence case by Defence Counsel Bram Fischer, followed by interjections from Justice Quartus de Wet and Prosecutor Percy Yutar, then a three-hour speech by Accused Number One (Nelson Mandela). Extracts from the recordings have been published by SABC entitled 'The voice of Nelson Mandela: extracts from famous speeches', SABC/EMI, 2002 (EMI 724353736521; NSA shelfmark 1CD0189137).

Transcripts available.

Untitled

Archive of the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM)

Archive of the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) and predecessor material including the Boycott Movement. Material directly related to the Rivonia Trial includes:
O.7 Political Prisoners Campaigns, 1956-95:
-O.7.1.b Correspondence, 1962-70: Correspondence concerning the Rivonia trialists and other condemned South African leaders, 1964 (MSS AAM 1791)
-O.7.5.e General files, 1961-95: Information on the Rivonia trial and trialists, 1963-90 (MSS AAM 1953)

W.2 African National Congress (ANC) posters, 1978-95:
'We salute our leaders. Sentenced to life imprisonment. Rivonia 1963. Mandela, Sisulu, Mbeki, Mhlaba, Motsoaledi, Mlangeni, Kathrada, Goldberg.' 1980s? Mainly black and white; photographs (MSS AAM 2512/2/4), 1 poster

Rivonia Trial references might also appear in other parts of this collection for example, the campaigns the AAM took relating to the Trial might appear in the minutes of the Executive Committee and in annual reports.

British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM)

Papers of Sir Patrick Wall

  • US UHBJL MR-RT-149
  • Collection
  • 1890 - 1992
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Sir Patrick was Vice Chairman of the British Section of the Inter Parliamentary Union (1974 - 1984) and Chairman of the British Bahrain, British Maltese, British South Africa and British Taiwan Groups. He represented Britain at the 17th General Assembly of the United Nations in 1962. The introduction of the General Law Amendment Act, the Rivonia Trials and the United Nations conference on sanctions are some of the more significant topics on which files were accumulated in the early 1960s [DPW/48/484; 487; 486 & 488].

Wall, Patrick

The Guardian and the Observer Digital Archive

This archive will eventually contain the digital reproduction of every page, article and advert published in the Guardian (since 1821) and the Observer (since 1791). Currently it is up to 2000. A search for Rivonia Trial reveals articles from both newspapers.

Guardian

Amnesty International : International Secretariat : [Part 2]

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 in London as an independent organisation to mobilise public opinion in defence of people who are imprisoned because their ideas are unacceptable to the government in their country. One of their areas of work is campaigning for the release of political prisoners and actions against torture.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 1]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : Scottish Committee : [Part 2]

Activities in Scotland started in the 1960s with AAM branches in Glasgow and Edinburgh, leading to the establishment of the Scottish Committee and opening an office in 1989. It was active in boycott campaigns, support to South African anti-apartheid organisations, the End Loans to South Africa campaigns and the call for comprehensive sanctions. It had a women’s subcommittee, youth desk and a trade union subcommittee as well as a Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action against Apartheid. It dissolved in 1994 and continued as Action for Southern Africa Scotland (ACTSA Scotland).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 1]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 2]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust

The South Africa Racial Amity Trust (SARAT), launched in 1966, was the predecessor of The Bishop Ambrose Reeves Trust (BART). SARAT aimed to promote knowledge about apartheid through research and publications. It paid special attention to the plight of children under apartheid. It was renamed BART in 1980 in honour of its treasurer. It was dissolved in 1996.

Campaign Against Arms Trade

The Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) was established in 1974 by several peace and other organisations concerned about the growing arms trade. It is a broad coalition of organisations working towards ending the arms trade. It works through local groups and networks and organises demonstrations and campaigns.

Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa

The Canon Collins Trust was founded by the British Defence and Aid Fund (BDAF) in 1981 to assist South African and Namibian refugee students to receive higher education and training. Students received their training in the UK and independent African states. It merged with the Legal Assistance Trust in 2012 and continues to operate as Canon Collins Educational and Legal Assistance Trust.

Christian Aid : [Part 1]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Christian Aid : [Part 2]

Christian Aid was instrumental in galvanising anti-apartheid efforts in the UK. Director Rev. Michael Taylor drove the creation of the Southern Africa Coalition in the 1980s, which brought together trade unions, church groups and others to press the British government to help end apartheid. The organisation started as Christian Reconstruction in Europe shortly after World War II. It became a department of the British Council of Churches, and was eventually renamed the Department of Interchurch Aid and Refugee Service. It was renamed Christian Aid in 1964.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 1]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

End Loans to Southern Africa

The End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA) started in 1974 with campaigns against British banks with South Africa ties. Its aim was to end apartheid through the imposition of effective financial sanctions. It broadened its work to include consumer and shareholder action and parliamentary lobbying. It did a lot of research to support its campaigns. It transformed itself into the Southern Africa Economic Research Unit (SAERU) in 1994.

Hackney Trades Council

The Hackney Trades Council was a trade union organisation that was involved in a wide variety of local and national campaigns and issues, including the anti-apartheid movement.

Health and Refugee Trust of South Africa

The Health and Refugee Trust of South Africa was established in 1988. The prime objective of HEART was the provision of health and welfare to the tens of thousands of South African refugees during the apartheid regime. They sought to actively promote health education, immunisation, nutrition, and provision of essential drugs, water and sanitation and treatment of common diseases.

Liberation : [Part 2]

Liberation started in 1954 as the Movement for Colonial Freedom (MCF) and changed its name in 1970 to Liberation. Its mission was to work towards the political freeing of colonial peoples and political independence. It worked with trade unions and the labour party, supported the AAM, War on Want and other organisations. It did a lot of educational work, organised public meetings and conferences, and lobbied government. It dissolved in 1997.

Oil Working Group : [Part 1]

The Oil Working Group was created in 1980 by War on Want, the Methodist Church Overseas Division and the United Reform Church to raise the issue of illegal oil exports to Southern Africa. They lobbied oil companies, raised questions at annual general meetings, undertook research and publicised their findings. The group was renamed Embargo in 1985 and ELTSA took over its administration. Embargo functioned until 1993.

Oil Working Group : [Part 2]

The Oil Working Group was created in 1980 by War on Want, the Methodist Church Overseas Division and the United Reform Church to raise the issue of illegal oil exports to Southern Africa. They lobbied oil companies, raised questions at annual general meetings, undertook research and publicised their findings. The group was renamed Embargo in 1985 and ELTSA took over its administration. Embargo functioned until 1993.

Oxfam International

Oxfam International was formed in 1995 by a group of independent non-governmental organisations. The name 'Oxfam' comes from Oxford Committee for Famine Relief, founded in Britain in 1942. Oxfam International member NGOs aimed to work together for greater impact on the international stage to reduce poverty and injustice. They organised their own anti-apartheid campaigns, and also participated in campaigns organised by AAMs.

Southampton Anti-Apartheid Group

The Southampton Anti-apartheid Group is perhaps best remembered for delivering a giant Barclays cheque to the local Barclays branch on 4 April 1979. The cheque was made payable ‘for bribery and corruption by the South African Government’ and signed ‘Connie Muldergate’. South African Information Minister Connie Mulder was forced to resign because he established a government slush fund to promote South Africa’s image overseas. SAAG was also involved in the boycott of South African imports, as well as the Shell and BP boycott organised by the national AAM in 1981.

Trades Union Congress : [Part 2]

The TUC is a federation of trade unions in the UK which started in 1868. It gave direct support to unions in South Africa and was active in boycott campaigns nationally and internationally.

War Resisters’ International

The WRI was established in 1921 as an organisation against war. Its members refuse to support war or preparations for war in various forms, such as refusing to engage in military service, pay taxes to support the military, etc. It is fundamentally committed to nonviolent action as a form of social struggle. WRI has provided training in nonviolence and held a number of international conferences. WRI was involved with solidarity work with the End Conscription Campaign and the Conscientious Objectors Support Group, which was formally affiliated with WRI.

World Gold Commission

The World Gold Commission (WGC) was founded in 1988 to promote worldwide sanctions against South African gold sales. It received financial support from the UN Centre Against Apartheid and was backed by the AAM and the liberation movements. It was active in information dissemination and the presentation of evidence to international bodies.

National Archives United Kingdom

David Astor correspondence to the British Ambassador Sir John Maud thanking him for helping him to get the books to Nelson Mandela (13 October 1962.) John Maud’s correspondence to David Astor confirming receipt the of Nelson Mandela letter's receiving the books (4 October 1962). Enclosed is a receipt from Nelson Mandela for the books (2 October 1962). Hand written note from Nelson Mandela confirming that he received the books via the embassy (14 September 1962). Correspondence from the resident commissioner , Mafikeng to the High commission, Cape Town. Nelson Mandela travels ( 20 January 1962). Correspondence from the High Commission in Cape Town to the Secretary of State Colonies. Arrival of Mandela in Lobatse and a charter to fly him to Tanganyika paid by a bank in Dar es Salaam (22 January 1962)

Astor, David

National Archives United Kingdom

Death sentence in Rivonia trial "unlikely"
Note (4 June 1964)
Upcoming judgment and sentence in the Rivonia trial
Note (2 June 1964)
The Australian representative to South Africa has been instructed to register his government's concern over the Rivonia trial.
Note (9 June 1964)
U.K. should abstain in the vote on the Rivonia resolution by Ivory Coast and Morocco unless is amended ( Add as that America will also abstain)
Note ( 10 June 1964)
Verdicts in the Rivonia trial
Telegram (11 June 1964)
Analysis of evidence at the Rivonia trial
Report ( 10 June 1964)
Decision to defer any attempt by the U.S. to get a reduction in Rivonia trail sentences until the defence has lodged an appeal.
Note ( 14 June 1964)
Unsigned copy of the Rivonia trial judgment
Judgment: Rivonia trial (15 June 1964)

National Archives United Kingdom

Winnie and Nelson Mandela
Correspondence from A Fleming to British Prime Minister James Callaghan ((14 August 1976). Political situation in South Africa - refers to Winnie and Nthato Motlana seeking an interdict in restraining Mr. Shabangu of Soweto, UCB from molesting children and property.

National Archives United Kingdom

The trial and sentencing of Constable Johannes Arnoldus Greef for his role on helping Arthur Goldreich to escape. Newspaper article. Report on the substance of O.R. Tambo to the U.N. special committee about people accused of sabotage . Report 9 October 1963. Report on the proceedings of the Rivonia trial. Press reports. 222 Acts of sabotage between 10 August 1961 and 1963. Article from the Star (9 October 1963). Moves to raise Pretoria trial issue at U.N. Article from the Star ( 10 October 1963). Conversation with Bram Fischer about the Rivonia trial. Letter from Durossil to the Foreign Office, London ( 19 October 1963). De Wet quashed indictment "The Rivonia trial collapses.
Articles from the Rand Daily Mail. ( 30 October 1963)

Rand Daily Mail

Mrs. Mandela Winnie Mandela on husbands 'sentence

British members of Parliament taking part in the campaign to mobilise world opinion over the sentence of Nelson Mandela in South Africa. Petition with 91000 signatures from groups representing 258 million people in 29 countries calling for the release of all South African political prisoners. In South Africa Mrs. Mandela spoke about her husband, Nelson Mandela, the leader of the banned African National Congress who is imprisoned for life with seven others. 15 June 1964

Palace of Justice as verdict on Mandela and others is given

All eight men found guilty in South Africa's sabotage trial were sentenced to life imprisonment. Nelson Mandela the 46 year old former chief of banned African National Congress and the other seven were found guilty of sabotage and plotting to overthrow the government. Mr. Justice Quartus De Wet pronounced the guilt of eight men. A crowd of some 500 people stood silently outside the court as police stood ready to quell disturbances. In the crowd were Nelson Mandela 's wife Winnie and Mrs. Sisulu. Mrs. Mandela was allowed into the court after an argument with a police officer. When she came outside she explained to the Africans waiting outside, that the sentences would be announced on that day. When the crowd heard the verdict they raised their fists. The sign of Amandla the African National Congress party and chanted- 12 June 1962

Mandela- Elections

The African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela has alleged that widespread sabotage is taking place in the current election. Polling stations in areas predominated by black voters have run out of ballot papers and voting has been extended for an extra day.

Archbishop Trevor Huddleston

Trevor Huddleston collection includes correspondence on Nelson Mandela, speeches, addresses, newspaper cuttings , Free Mandela Campaigns and 1990 concert . Celebration of the Nelson Mandela's 70th birthday held at Wembley Stadium. Includes correspondence and papers relating to a service celebrating the release of Nelson Mandela (broadcast February 1990).
Audio visual collection, metering on the inauguration of Nelson Mandela. BBC program on Nelson Mandela as president of South Africa.

Huddleston, Trevor

Black Theatre Forum (BTF)

Malcolm Frederick folder includes a letter to Whoopee Goldberg and Nelson Mandela's response to Miriam Makeba regarding the Children of Africa charity event.

Mary Benson Papers

The personal papers of Mary Benson. The collection includes:
Nelson Mandela’s statement from the dock at the Rivonia Trial. Correspondence, reports and statements about the treatment of political prisoners in South Africa; Reports by the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) and Amnesty International. Attempts to publicise the conditions of prisoners, particularly Nelson Mandela, and information about the medical treatment of prisoners.
Papers related to Nelson Mandela’s imprisonment, collected by Benson when writing her biography of Mandela, "Nelson Mandela: the Man and the Movement."
Correspondence between Mandela and Mary Benson and between Benson and others people mainly related to Mandela and campaigns for his release from prison. Correspondents include Helen Suzman, Elinor Birley, Hilda Bernstein, Oliver Tambo, Winnie Mandela, Denis Healey and Ismail Ayob.
Typed notes on Mandela and other prisoners, as well as lists of political prisoners. News clippings concerning Mandela, mainly from British newspapers. Includes reports on the dropping of negligence charges against Mandela in 1967.

Benson, Mary

Ruth First Papers

The personal papers of Ruth First
The collection is made up of background material, correspondence and reviews concerning "No Easy Walk to Freedom" edited by Ruth First. Printed copies of Nelson Mandela’s speech at the Rivonia Trial. Drafts of sections of the book, and a typescript of Mary Benson’s statement before the UN Special Committee on Apartheid in 1964, with handwritten alterations. Correspondence, mainly between Ruth First and Heinemann Publishers, as well as clippings of newspaper reviews.
Material on political detention between 1963 and 1970, including a copy of the 1963 Detention Act, a radio script by Mary Benson entitled "Nelson Mandela and the Rivonia Trial," and notes produced by Ruth First. Press releases and conference papers concerning the Symposium on the exploitation of Blacks in South Africa and Namibia, organized by the United Nations in 1978, with observances of the 60th birthday of Nelson Mandela.
Transcripts of interviews with Robben Island political prisoners. Correspondence from friends and acquaintances, and materials from South African newspapers concerning the Rivonia Trial.

First, Ruth

Results 301 to 400 of 496