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Collectie Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika

Correspondence, memoranda, campaign materials and lists. The collection includes:
-Correspondence between the Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika and the African National Congress (ANC) London office concerning the Rivonia Trial and pressure being placed on the Dutch government to condemn the trial.
-Campaigns for the release of the Rivonia Trialists, and about 5000 political prisoners in South Africa.

Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika

ICFTU Archives

Working papers of The International Confederation of Trade Unions. Rivonia Trial related records:
4873 Correspondence concerning the Rivonia trial. 1963-1965. 1 folder.
4874-4875 Correspondence concerning the Treason Trials. Including correspondence with the South Africa Defence and Aid Fund. 1956-1969. 2 folders.
48741956-1962. 48751963-1969.

International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU)

Interview with Nelson Mandela

Part of Kairos collection.
Sound for film. Interview with Nelson Mandela re Rivonia trial (amongst other topics) in Dutch (?)

Untitled

Norwegian Church Aid [Kirkens Nødhjelp]

The NCA is a Christian emergency relief and development aid organisation. It was formed after World War II, when it started its work in Europe. In the 1970s it expanded its work to the rest of the world. It has supported many projects in Southern Africa, mainly through church organisations. The South African Council of Churches was one of its main collaborators, and channelled funds to the liberation movement inside South Africa.

Norwegian Council for Southern Africa [Fellesrådet for det sørlige Afrika] : [Part 2]

NOCOZA was formed in 1967 by a merger of NAMA and CFSA. It was an umbrella organisation for youth organisations and undertook solidarity work for southern Africa and anti-apartheid activities. It opened for individual membership and other organisations in 1976 and started local committees. It also worked with the Shipping Research Bureau on the oil boycott of South Africa. It continued to operate after 1994 as Norwegian Council for Africa.

Operation Day’s Work [Operasjon Dagsverk]

ODW is a student organisation that organises annual solidarity campaigns in Norway. The money earned by volunteers for one day's work is donated to education projects in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The Norwegian Council for Southern Africa (NOCOZA) and SAIH both were beneficiaries of this initiative.

Nobel peace prize 1993: Nelson Mandela, FW de Klerk

Nobel peace prize 1993 for Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk. Nelson Mandela and president FW de Klerk. The collection has audio and vide on both Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk acceptance speeches. The collection also has photos of the event. The Noble foundation mentiones that the policy of reconciliation that Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk represent provides hope not only for South Africa , it is also a shining example for the world that there are ways out of the vicious circle of violence and bitterness.

Norwergian Nobel committee

International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement [Arbeiderbevegelsens Internasjonale Støttekomité]

The International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement was a solidarity committee organised under the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions, supporting and working with international solidarity and union issues. The Norwegian Trade Union movement was one of the key movements in Norway supporting the liberation struggle in Southern Africa. AIS worked closely with the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU)

Norwegian Council for Southern Africa [Fellesrådet for det sørlige Afrika] : [Part 1]

NOCOZA was formed in 1967 by a merger of NAMA and CFSA. It was an umbrella organisation for youth organisations and undertook solidarity work for southern Africa and anti-apartheid activities. It opened for individual membership and other organisations in 1976 and started local committees. It also worked with the Shipping Research Bureau on the oil boycott of South Africa. It continued to operate after 1994 as Norwegian Council for Africa.

Norwegian People’s Aid [Norsk Folkehjelp]

The NPA was formed in 1939 as a humanitarian organisation with emergency relief and development aid programmes. It was the voluntary organisation of the trade union movement. It started to support the liberation movements in Southern Africa financially during the 1970s and became the main channel for Norwegian assistance to the ANC.

Norwegian Students’ and Academics’ International Assistance Fund [Studentenes og Akademikernes Internasjonale Hjelpefond] : [Part 1]

SAIH was established in 1961 and worked with other NGOs and institutions to support projects in Africa and Latin America. It organised local universities and colleges around educational projects and supported many projects from the liberation movements. A substantial amount of their funding came directly from students’ contributions.

International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement

Correspondence, minutes of meetings, conference resolutions, reports, press statements, pamphlets and news clippings, concerning Zenani Mandela's visit to Oslo in 1985, and the continued imprisonment of Nelson Mandela and other South African political leaders.

International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement

Norwegian Action Against Apartheid

Correspondence, memoranda, newsletters, pamphlets, reports, publications and other campaign materials concerning:
The World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners (1964 - 1967). The Rivonia Trial, and a call to save South Africa's resistance leaders, including Nelson Mandela, from the death penalty. Nelson Mandela's statement from the dock at the Rivonia Trial, translated into Norwegian.
Amnesty International reports on prison conditions in South Africa (1965).

Norwegian Action Against Apartheid

Norwegian Labour Movement Archives and Library: Photographic Collection

Collection of photographs of Nelson Mandela's visits to Norway. Includes images of Nelson Mandela inside the Norwegian parliament, street scenes, and the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to Mandela and De Klerk. There are images of both Nelson Mandela and FW De Klerk addressing the audience, as well as photographs of family members and close friends in attendance, including Zenani Mandela and Pik Botha. There are also images of anti-De Klerk protesters outside.
Photographs are by Terje Akerhaug, Stein Marienborg and Arne Ove Bergo.

Norwegian Labour Movement

Landsorganisasjonens Internasjonale Avdeling

This collection includes documentation concerning the following:
Biographies of the Rivonia Trialists. A statement issued by the national executive of the ANC on February 16 1990, in the wake of decisions to unban political organisations, and the impending release of Nelson Mandela. The talks between the ANC and the South African government in 1990, documented in the Pretoria Minute. Festival held in Oslo, celebrating Nelson Mandela's release from prison. Nelson Mandela's visit to Oslo in 1992. Includes correspondence between the International Solidarity Committee of the Norwegian Labour Movement and the ANC Norway Mission. Statement by Nelson Mandela on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993. Birthday greetings (1993).
Includes correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, press statements, pamphlets and news clippings..

Norwegian Labour Movement

Norwegian Labour Movement Archives and Library: Press Clippings Collection

Collection of news clippings, mostly in Norwegian, that covers the following:
Arrests in South Africa during the 1952 Defiance Campaign. The 1956 treason trial. Nelson Mandela in hiding as the "Black Pimpernel" (1964). Historical profiles of Nelson Mandela. The Rivonia Trial, with references to Nelson Mandela and Percy Yutar (1964), and reports on Nelson Mandela and others found guilty on charges of sabotage. A telegram sent to Verwoerd by 21 Norwegian youth organisations, in protest against the life sentences imposed on Nelson Mandela and other prisoners. Reactions to the Rivonia Trial verdict by the Foreign Minister of Great Britain, Richard Butler, as well as a statement by Verwoerd that Nelson Mandela and his men are in the category of spies, and that they have a communist plan to take over the world. The arrest of Nelson Mandela's advocate, Bram Fischer.
Zenani Mandela's visit to Oslo in 1985, with biographical profiles of Nelson Mandela.

Norwegian Labour Movement Archives and Library

Norwegian Action Against Apartheid

  • NO NLMAL MR-RT-033
  • Collection
  • 1964 - 1967
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Translated from Norsk Aksjon Mot Apartheid.
Correspondence, memoranda, newsletters, pamphlets, reports, publications and other campaign materials concerning:
-The World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners (1964 - 1967).
-The Rivonia Trial, and a call to save South Africa's resistance leaders, including Nelson Mandela, from the death penalty.
-Mandela's statement from the dock at the Rivonia Trial, translated into Norwegian.
-Amnesty International reports on prison conditions in South Africa (1965).

Norwegian Action Against Apartheid

Norwegian Labour Movement: Press Clippings Collection

  • NO NLMAL MR-RT-034
  • Collection
  • 1952 - 1965
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Collection of news clippings, mostly in Norwegian, that include:
-Historical profiles of Mandela
-Rivonia Trial, with references to Mandela and Percy Yutar (1964), and reports on Mandela and others being found guilty on charges of sabotage
-Telegram sent to Verwoerd by 21 Norwegian youth organisations, in protest against the life sentences imposed on Mandela and other prisoners
-Reactions to the Rivonia Trial judgement by the Foreign Minister of Great Britain, Richard Butler, as well as a statement by Verwoerd that Mandela and his men are in the category of spies, and that they have a communist plan to take over the world

Untitled

Seafarer's Union

In December 1989, the Federated Cooks and Stewards of NZ, the NZ Seamen's Union and the North Shore Ferry Employees merged to form the NZ Seafarers' Union. The Maritime Union of New Zealand was formed in 2002 when the New Zealand Waterfront Workers’ Union and the New Zealand Seafarers’ Union joined together.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, New Zealand Section

In December 1916, a New Zealand branch of WILPF was established in Auckland. Branches in other cities were soon organised. In 1981 WILPF NZ organised a Women Against the Tour march in Auckland. Seven hundred people took part and 550 signed a petition, urging that the South African rugby team’s tour of NZ be cancelled. WILPF NZ members also took part in protests held when the tour went ahead. In 1989 the section’s name was officially changed to WILPF Aotearoa.

Citizens Association for Racial Equality

Founded in 1964, the Citizens Association for Racial Equality (CARE) campaigned to eliminate all sporting contacts with South Africa so long as it practiced apartheid. CARE spearheaded opposition to the 1965 Springbok rugby tour of New Zealand. Besides working towards a boycott of all sports contacts with South Africa it also focused on racism in New Zealand.

Halt All Racist Tours : [Part 1]

HART was a national organisation that operated from 1969 until 1980. It started with the campaign against the Springbok-All Black Rugby Tours of 1970 and preventing other sporting contacts with South Africa. In 1980 HART merged with the National Anti-Apartheid Committee, becoming HART:NZAAM.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 2]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History

The Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History (RGASPI), formerly the Marx-Lenin Institute, was established in 1999 as a merger of two other archives, the Russian Centre for the Preservation and Study of Documents of Most Recent History and the Centre for the Preservation of Documents of Youth Organisations. RGASPI contains the archives of the Communist International and includes material about its relations with the Communist Party of South Africa.

Bread and Fishes [Brödet och Fiskarna] : [Part 1]

Bread and Fishes was established in 1972 as a Christian organisation, mainly engaged in social work. The main issue was international solidarity and it worked at a very practical level, selling second-hand goods to raise funds. It started to support the ANC in 1974 and, besides shipping goods and medical supplies to ANC camps and also gave direct financial support. It worked with the Africa Groups of Sweden (AGS).

Africa Groups of Sweden [Afrikagrupperna] : [Part 2]

The AGS was formed in 1974 by several local Africa groups, some of them already active in the early 1960s. It gave unconditional support to the liberation struggle. It began its work by supporting the struggles in the Portuguese colonies and continued to work on Southern Africa lobbying the Swedish government to institute sanctions. It initiated the establishment of the Isolate South Africa Committee (ISAK). In 1992 the AGS merged with the Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation / Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation, and continues to operate as Afrikagrupperna.

Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation [Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation]

The ARO was initiated by the AGS 1978, initially to recruit health care workers, teachers and administrators to work in the former Portuguese colonies. It expanded its work to ANC camps and schools and was active in these areas until 1992. When apartheid ended and Namibia became independent, ARO’s main task became to support the reconstruction of South Africa and Namibia. As a consequence, the activities of ARO and the Africa Groups of Sweden became similar, and the organisations merged in 1992 under the name the Africa Groups of Sweden (Afrikagrupperna).

Commission of the Churches on International Affairs - World Council of Churches

The CCIA started to operate in 1946 and is comprised of thirty people nominated by churches and regional ecumenical organisations to advise the World Council of Churches (WCC) in international affairs. It focuses on peace-making and peaceful resolution of conflicts, militarism, disarmament and arms control. After 1975, a Human Rights Advisory Group was formed within the CCIA to advise on policy in this area. The scope of the organisation was much extended in 2006, when it merged with three other WCC advisory bodies.

Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee : [Part 6]

The SKSSAA was the state organisation through which a lot of the Soviet support to the liberation movements was channelled. SKSSAA was active internationally in the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. SKSSAA provided the African National Congress in exile with material resources, such as food, clothes and vehicles. The SKSSAA and other Soviet NGOs received South Africans in need of medical treatment, and arranged stays for them at Soviet hospitals. The organisation also coordinated activities for South African students in the Soviet Union. In 1992 the organisation was renamed Society of Afro-Asian Peoples' Solidarity and Co-operation.

The Nordic Documentation on the Liberation Struggle in Southern Africa Project

This site provides archival lists of primary source materials that can be found at Nordic archival institutions, NGOs and archives of individuals who have been involved in the liberation struggles of Southern Africa. The website includes interviews, photographs, publications, posters and newspaper cuttings from 1960-1996. It also provides some archival materials in PDF format.

World Council of Churches

Nelson Mandela addresses crowds of supporters and tells them that "as long as the main pillars of
apartheid are still in place " pressure for economic sanctions against South Africa need to be
maintained. Actuality crowd at arrival of Mr. Nelson Mandela.

Taskforce on the Churches and Social Responsibity

World Council of Churches

Nelson Mandela's visit to the World Council of Churches in Geneva Program details the introduction of Nelson Mandela's, his life, mentions guests including Castro, Emilio Nelson Mandela visit to WCC, Nelson Mandela symbol of freedom struggle; Links between support, solidarity.

Western Province Council of Churches official archives

World Council of Churches

Newspaper article on Nelson Mandela " Fight Aids like Apartheid" Times December 1 - 2003 " Stop Aids nonsense" Mandela tells Mbeki's government to halt debates and fight the war" Sunday Times 17 February 2002 Visit to World Council of Churches 8 June 1990. Thanks to the role of the World Council of Churches in the anti- apartheid struggle. Religious anecdote/ Mandela Nelson. Introduction to Winnie Mandela's speech/ Thabo Mbeki. Talk about jail, exile and the role of the World Council of Churches for political prisoners. Sanctions against apartheid regime. Help to the political prisoners and exiles.

World Council of Churches

World Council of Churches

General correspondence about the World Council of Churches policy special fund grants,
especially in South Africa. Contains a memorandum from Nelson Mandela to FW De Klerk

World Council of Churches

World Council of Churches

World day on prayer for South Africa, 16 June 1986 ; South Africa 1987-1988; South Africa 1990; South Africa- Part I Nelson Mandela visit; Part II African National Congress.

World Council of Churches

Africa Groups of Sweden [Afrikagrupperna] : [Part 1]

The AGS was formed in 1974 by several local Africa groups, some of them already active in the early 1960s. It gave unconditional support to the liberation struggle. It began its work by supporting the struggles in the Portuguese colonies and continued to work on Southern Africa lobbying the Swedish government to institute sanctions. It initiated the establishment of the Isolate South Africa Committee (ISAK). In 1992 the AGS merged with the Africa Groups Recruitment Organisation / Afrikagruppernas Rekryteringsorganisation, and continues to operate as Afrikagrupperna.

Bread and Fishes [Brödet och Fiskarna] : [Part 2]

Bread and Fishes was established in 1972 as a Christian organisation, mainly engaged in social work. The main issue was international solidarity and it worked at a very practical level, selling second-hand goods to raise funds. It started to support the ANC in 1974 and, besides shipping goods and medical supplies to ANC camps and also gave direct financial support. It worked with the Africa Groups of Sweden (AGS).

Consultation Committee for Southern Africa [Samrådskommittén för Södra Afrika]

The Samrådskommittén för Södra Afrika (Consultation Committee for Southern Africa) was probably formed in 1973 and based on two declarations, the so-called Oslo and ILO documents. It was an umbrella committee or a network of organizations which all in one way or another were involved in the support for the liberation movements in Southern Africa. The member organizations represented various sections of the Swedish society, such as the labor movement, leftist and liberal political parties, youth organizations, the church and religious organizations, ANC and SWAPO representations, solidarity organizations for Vietnam, Cuba and Palestine and others. The committee arranged a campaign week in December 1973. The committee was probably dissolved in 1974.

Isolate South Africa Committee [Isolera Sydafkrika-Kommittén]

ISAC was an umbrella organisation consisting of a variety of organisations in one way or another engaged in the support for the struggle against apartheid and colonialism in southern Africa. ISAC started in 1979 when it organised its first annual campaign to isolate South Africa and to support the liberation movements and political prisoners. It became an influential lobby group and often worked together with other Nordic countries. Its campaign work expanded from the annual campaign to year-long activities. It ceased to function in 1995.

Support Group for the People of South Africa [Stödgruppen för Sydafrikas Folk]

The SSF started in 1974 and worked closely together with the Africa Groups of Sweden (AGS) and the Stockholm Africa Group. At that time the AGS was mainly involved with the former Portuguese colonies. It became a working group at the ANC office in Stockholm in 1979, and ceased to be an independent organisation in the same year.

Swedish Labour Movement Archives and Library [Arbetarrörelsens arkiv och bibliotek]

The Labour Movement Archives and Library hold substantial collections of the Swedish labour movement from around the 1950s. It holds records from political parties and other organisations as well. It concentrates on archives of the central and Stockholm-based local organisations. It holds a big Africa collection.

Swedish South Africa Committee [Svenska Sydafrikakommittén]

The SSAC was formed in 1961 as an umbrella organisation of NGOs to start campaigning for a consumer boycott of South African products. It pressured the Swedish government to apply sanctions and later supported the ANC’s armed struggle. The committee dominated the anti-apartheid work in Sweden during the 1960s but its activities decreased as other organisations became more active.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : French-speaking branch [Mouvement Anti-Apartheid Suisse] : [Part 1]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement of Geneva (MAAG) was founded in 1965 as the French-speaking branch of the national anti-apartheid movement. The organisation changed its name to MAAS in 1970. The initiators of MAAS had mainly a religious background. Both MAAS and its German-speaking sister branch AAB were co-ordinated by a common national committee. MAAS dissolved in 1994.

Swiss Anti-Apartheid Movement : German-speaking branch [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung der Schweiz] : [Part 1]

The Swiss German-speaking branch AAB was established on 1 March 1975 with the secretariat based in Zurich. The AAB organised numerous demonstrations, protest actions, conferences and seminars. Both AAB and its sister branch, MAAS, were co-ordinated by a common national committee. AAB activities were supported by various religious and social organisations. The AAB initiated the establishment of two other organisations, namely the Früchteboykott (Fruit Boycott) and the Aktion Finanzplatz Schweiz-Dritte Welt. The AAB changed its name to AAB Südliches Afrika in 1994, and MAAS dissolved in the same year.

The Nationalist (Tanzanian newspaper)

1964, Race war in S.A. imminent
S Africa accuses UThant of partiality. Churches urged to act on South Africa. Widespread police raids follow Job bombing. ANC praises Mwalimu's stand on South Africa. Freedom leader asks for S.A. action including the release of Nelson Mandela, South African issue, South African police resume raids on Cape Town Homes increased prison repression on political prisoners. We regret to announce their deaths, Vuyisile Mini, Wilson Khayingo, Zinakile Mkaba ( Dulcie et decorum) Hanged in Pretoria.

Nationalist

The Tanganyika Standard (Daily Newspaper in Tanzania )

Newspaper articles on South Africa 1963
Hard bargaining between western powers and South African States: Arms embargo on South Africa. Liberation a burden for all Africa, More arms support arms embargo to South Africa, End trading with South Africa Nyerere, South Africa urged to heed U.N. and strive for racial harmony: Uthant attacks apartheid, S.A. on brink of disaster, Four escape S.A. police, Escape trio on way, Cell guards coshed in escape - police: SA. Exits watched, Expel S. Africa call to U.N.: Arms blockade suggested, Mystery fire at airport delays Goldreich's arrival in Dar, Escapers due in second freedom flight, Airline doubts over safety: EAA recalls rescue plane: flight To Mbeya, Goldreich and Wolpe fly out: Stops in Federal territory avoided, ANC fearful of another kidnap plot, Beware of the avalanche South Africa told. The Hodgsons in Tanganyika and fighting on, Goldreich and Wolpe "evil traitors, Scandinavians give Verwoed a chance: Find alternative to apartheid. Daily Newspaper in Tanzania on South Africa.

Tanganyika Standard

The Nationalist (Tanzania newspaper) 1967

ANC gives its backing to UAR South African freedom day June 26; mentions defiance campaign - Nelson Mandela . South Africa expels Anglican priest , June 26, Millions mourn Luthuli , July 3. Luthuli's final failure is a tragedy of South Africa July 31. Freedom fighters, July 31. Luthuli funeral, July 31. Campaign against apartheid August 9 celebration. Albert Luthuli 's death a big blow, August 9.

Nationalist

Tanzania Daily News

Kenneth Kaunda. Urges the U S to put pressure on South Africa and gives reasons for that.
1 April 1983.

Tanzania Daily News

Tanganyika Standard

Articles on South Africa in Tanzanian daily newspaper, 1963. Include the following related to the Rivonia Trial:
-Four escape S.A. police
-Escape trio on way
-Cell guards coshed in escape - police: SA. Exits watched
-Mystery fire at airport delays Goldreich's arrival in Dar
-Escapers due in second freedom flight
-Airline doubts over safety: EAA recalls rescue plane: flight to Mbeya
-Goldreich and Wolpe fly out: Stops in Federal territory avoided
-ANC fearful of another kidnap plot
-Goldreich and Wolpe "evil traitors"

Tanganyika Standard

African Activists Archive Project

The African Activists Archive Project at Michigan State University works to preserve the history of US organisations and people in the struggle against apartheid. The very substantial website contains a directory of archives with descriptions. The project also has a substantial section on organisations outside the USA.

African Activist Archive

  • US AI002 MR-RT-140
  • Collection
  • 1950 - 1999
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Gathered from various repositories and private sources to preserve records and memories of activism in the United States in support of the struggles of African peoples against colonialism, apartheid, and social injustice from the 1950s through the 1990s.

A search for Rivonia Trial material yields:
-Photographs of demonstrations outside the South African Consulate in New York protesting the outcome of the Rivonia Trial (from private collections and American Committee on Africa)
-Buttons: "Free Motsoaledi", "Free Kathrada" "Free Mandela", "Happy birthday Motsoaledi" (from Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa)

Untitled

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 1]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

Len T. Holden

Len Holden was a Bedford Council member, and founder of the Bedford Anti-Apartheid Group. The group was active from the 1980s until 1991, lobbying companies and politicians to boycott the apartheid regime. Holden was also active in the Bedford Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament throughout the 1980s.

Clarity Films

Clarity Films is a not-for-profit organisation formed in 1979 to produce and distribute films of historical and social value. It produced several documentaries on South Africa and the solidarity movement. It holds over 250 hours of oral histories with137 interviewees, 800 hours of archival footage from many sources and a substantial photo and graphics collection.

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Africa News Service

ANS started in 1973 as a not-for-profit US news agency. For two decades it gathered news about Africa related issues and the US foreign policy towards Africa. It continues to operate as AllAfrica Global Media.

Institute for Policy Studies

IPS was a Washington based progressive think-tank concerned with the promotion of democracy, justice, human rights and diversity. It became active on anti-apartheid in the 1980s.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Alexander Defence Committee

The ADC operated from 1965 until about 1971. It supported Dr Neville Alexander and other political prisoners and their families in South Africa, and was active in Canada, Europe and the USA. It organised speaker tours and raised funds, also for the families of political prisoners.

Aluka

Aluka, founded in 2003, is a digital library with materials about Africa. The Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa content area is dedicated, amongst others, to the international anti-apartheid struggle. It has a huge collection of materials from organisations all over the world.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 1]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 3]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 4]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Amnesty International USA

The AI-USA started in the early 1960s and has several offices in the country. It is an affiliate of AI- International Secretariat and bases its activities on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The campaigns concentrate on the rights of political prisoners and unfair trials, working towards the release of prisoners of conscience.

Anti-Apartheid Support Group

AASG was based at the University of North Carolina and consisted mainly of students. It operated from about 1980-1987, but was not officially recognised as a student organisation until October 1985. Its main focus was to pressurise the University to disinvest from South Africa. The group dissolved when the university voted to divest in 1987.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Boston Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa

BCLSA was established after the 1976 Soweto uprising and started with a campaign against the ties between the First National Bank (FNB) of Boston and South Africa. It remained a specialist organisation but broadened its activities to disinvestment and boycott. It helped to form MassDivest in 1980, an organisation which led the campaign to disinvest the state pension from companies doing business with South Africa. It ceased to be a separate organisation in the mid 1980s and joined other organisations such as Free South Africa and TransAfrica.

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 1]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Capital District Coalition against Apartheid and Racism : [Part 2]

CD-CAAR was started by Albany, NY residents to prevent the Springbok Rugby Tour in 1981. It was a member of the Social Justice Center, an umbrella organisation dealing with peace and justice. It organised pickets and boycott campaigns, especially supporting the cultural boycott and was also active against racism in the USA. It campaigned for the divestment of New York state pension funds from companies dealing with South Africa. It re-organised itself in 1995 and changed its name to Capital District Coalition for Southern Africa and Against Racism.

Champaign-Urbana Coalition against Apartheid

This was a campus based group at the University of Illinois. It operated from 1964 till about 1991 and worked especially for divestment by the university, boycott and human rights campaigns. The organisation continued and broadened its work in the early 1990s and changed its name to the Champaign-Urbana Coalition on Africa.

Charlotteans for a Free Southern Africa

This local anti-apartheid organisation organised protests against loans by local business to the South African government. It also sponsored a number of events, and invited visits by speakers who would share insights and information with citizens of the community.

Committee to End Apartheid

This was an anti-apartheid group based in Springfield, Massassachusetts. In December 1978, as a result of a picket, Max Kay Jewelers agreed to stop selling the South African Krugerrand. Frances Crowe was a founding member.

Congressional Black Caucus : [Part 2]

In January of 1969, newly-elected African American representatives of the 77th Congress joined six incumbents to form the Democratic Select Committee. The committee was renamed the Congressional Black Caucus, and the CBC was born in 1971. The CBC played an important role in anti-apartheid activities. The first bill concerning apartheid was introduced by the CBC in 1972 and urged the US government to withdraw financial support to the South African government. It encouraged universities and corporations to disinvest from South Africa. In 1985 Representative William Gray introduced the HR1460 bill prohibiting loans to, and new investments in, South Africa. Congress approved the bill one year later and it became known as the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986. Members of the CBC were active in rallies, not only in Washington DC but in their home districts as well.

Cornell University Divestment Movement

A group at Cornell University, consisting of academics, staff and students, organised divestment campaigns at the university from 1976-1987. The group organised sit-ins and civil disobedience activities.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 4]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Educators against Racism and Apartheid

Educators against Racism and Apartheid began in 1985 as Educators against Apartheid but it extended its activities to include racism in the USA and changed its name. Besides developing educational materials for schools and publishing a newsletter distributed to educators all over the country; it also organised a boycott of Kellogg’s cereals, appealing to young people. It was active in a campaign to withdraw US teachers’ retirement funds from companies dealing with South Africa.

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 2]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.

Halt All Racist Tours : [Part 3]

HART was a national organisation that operated from 1969 until 1980. It started with the campaign against the Springbok-All Black Rugby Tours of 1970 and preventing other sporting contacts with South Africa. In 1980 HART merged with the National Anti-Apartheid Committee, becoming HART:NZAAM.

Hampshire College Committee for the Liberation of Southern Africa

The Hampshire College Committee for the Liberation of Southern Africa (HCCLSA) was a student organisation that campaigned to get Hampshire College to divest from companies doing business in South Africa. As a result, in 1976, Hampshire College became the first college in the country to divest from companies in South Africa. HCCLSA was involved in the formation of the Northeast Committee for the Liberation of Southern Africa, a coalition of organisations working for divestment of mostly organisations on college campuses.

International Council for Equality of Opportunity Principles

The ICEOP was founded in 1977 to promote social justice in South Africa. Reverend LH Sullivan devised a set of principles for companies conducting business in South Africa. This voluntary business code became known as the ‘Sullivan Principles’. The code required an annual independent evaluation of individual business activities in South Africa. The results were published in the public domain. The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and other anti-apartheid organisations disapproved of the ‘Sullivan Principles’ since it provided companies with a way out of the boycott.

International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa Canada : [Part 3]

The International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa Canada (IDAF Canada) operated from 1980-1990. It focused mainly on raising funds to support political prisoners and their families in South Africa and Namibia. US-IDAF executive director Kenneth N. Carstens was instrumental in the establishment of the Canadian IDAF.

International Defense and Aid Fund for Southern Africa- United States Committee

The US-IDAF was established in 1972. In addition to raising funds for legal defense of prisoners and aid for their dependents, it also disseminated information about conditions in Southern Africa and supported boycotts and other solidarity actions. It grew out of the International Defence and Aid Fund (IDAF). US-IDAF executive director Kenneth N. Carstens was also instrumental in the establishment of the Canadian IDAF.
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