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Honorary Freeman of the London Borough of Greenwich

Honorary Freemanship presented to Mr Mandela in appreciation of his service to Greenwich and his contribution to world peace, UK. A Resolution to Reaffirm the Honorary Freedom of Greenwich was passed on 13 March 2012

London Borough of Greenwich

Order of the Starra Planini

Received by Achmat Dangor, CEO of Nelson Mandela Foundation from Ambassador Volodya Neykov on behalf of Nelson Mandela for his contribution to freedom and human rights, the fight against the regime of apartheid

Posthumous Title of Honorary Member to Nelson Mandela from UIA

On July 18th, 2018, in honour of what would have been Nelson Mandela's 100th birthday, the UIA awarded him the posthumous title of Honorary Member. The ceremony took place in the Portuguese Ministry of Justice and was hosted by the Portuguese Minister of Justice Francisca van Dunem and UIA President, Pedro Pais de Almeida.

Union Internationale des Avocats

Action Committee on Southern Africa [Actie Komitee Zuidelijk Afrika] : [Part 1]

AKZA was a national organisation based in the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium. It operated from 1972-1991 and developed out of progressive student organisations. It started as the Flemish Angola Committee and supported the liberation movements directly. They organised numerous boycott campaigns and was instrumental in the formation of the largest social action coalition in Flanders, the Flemish Anti-Apartheid Coalition (Vlaamse Anti-Apartheid Koalitie - VAAK). It also collaborated with other AAMs and was part of the Liaison Group of Anti-Apartheid Movements within the European Community (known as the Liaison Group).

Africa Centre

The Africa Centre was established in 1964 in London to create awareness about developments in Africa. Leading African artists, writers, politicians and musicians met at the centre and it served as a platform by organising evenings with theatre and discussions.

Africa Educational Trust

The Africa Educational Trust (AET) was founded in 1958. Originally it was part of the Africa Bureau, which later split into the Africa Bureau and Africa Educational and Publication Trust. The main aim was to help exiles and refugees with their education.

Anti-Apartheid Movement : [Part 3]

The AAM started in 1959 under the name The Boycott Movement Committee. It changed its name to AAM in 1960 after the Sharpeville massacre to become a permanent organisation. It grew into one of the biggest anti-apartheid organisations in the world with committees covering specific subjects and branches all over the UK. It was a member of the European Liaison Group. It was often the fore-runner and initiator of international campaigns and worked closely with the ANC and UN agencies. It dissolved itself in 1995 to continue as Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany [Anti-Apartheid Bewegung] : [Part 2]

The Anti-Apartheid Movement Germany (AAB) operated from 1974 till 1994. It was formed on the initiative of the Mainz Working Group on Southern Africa (MAKSA). It was very active in the campaigns against the arms trade with South Africa, the release of Nelson Mandela, as well as the fruit, sport, Royal Dutch Shell and cultural boycott. It consisted of a network of local groups and worked with a variety of peace and religious organisations. In the late 1970s/early 1980s it used shareholders meetings (by buying shares) to pressurise banks not to deal with South Africa and pressured the Federal government to take an active anti-apartheid position. The AAB also participated in the Liaison Group. In May 1994 the AAB changed its name to Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis, which continued to carry out solidarity work with Southern Africa. Since the end of August 2001, Afrika-Süd Aktionsbündnis was dissolved and Koordination Südliches Afrika (KOSA, Co-ordination for Southern Africa) became the successor organisation.

Anti-Apartheid Movement, London (London Anti-Apartheid Committee) branch : [Part 2]

AAM London was the umbrella organisation for the 32 anti-apartheid groups in the Greater London area, and a regional committee of the national anti-apartheid movement. It took an active role in promoting the boycott movement, encouraging local groups to picket supermarkets, branches of Barclays Bank, Shell garages and other organisations supporting apartheid. It also encouraged involvement by the trade unions and churches, among many other organisations, in the anti-apartheid struggle.

Commission of the Churches on International Affairs - World Council of Churches

The CCIA started to operate in 1946 and is comprised of thirty people nominated by churches and regional ecumenical organisations to advise the World Council of Churches (WCC) in international affairs. It focuses on peace-making and peaceful resolution of conflicts, militarism, disarmament and arms control. After 1975, a Human Rights Advisory Group was formed within the CCIA to advise on policy in this area. The scope of the organisation was much extended in 2006, when it merged with three other WCC advisory bodies.

Committee on South African War Resistance : [Part 1]

COSAWR was founded in 1978 by South African draft (military service) resisters active in the UK. It was a self-help organisation for those escaping conscription in the SADF and to support those who were resisting conscription within the country. It raised the issue of militarism in South Africa and conducted research into the South African military structure and resistance to it. COSAWR established a presence in several other European countries. Its magazine 'Resister' became the leading magazine on South Africa's militarisation.

Committee on South African War Resistance : [Part 2]

COSAWR was founded in 1978 by South African draft (military service) resisters active in the UK. It was a self-help organisation for those escaping conscription in the SADF and to support those who were resisting conscription within the country. It raised the issue of militarism in South Africa and conducted research into the South African military structure and resistance to it. COSAWR established a presence in several other European countries. Its magazine 'Resister' became the leading magazine on South Africa's militarisation.

Country Committee for South Africa Action [Landskomiteen Sydafrika-Aktion] (Danish Anti Apartheid Movement) : [Part 1]

The Country Committee for South Africa Action (LSA) was formed in 1978 by several organisations and political parties. It was one of the first organisations to co-ordinate campaigns at the local level. It organised several information campaigns involving speaking tours of ANC members as well as cultural events. It continues to operate as Africa Contact.

Coventry Borough Labour Party : [Part 2]

The Coventry Labour Representation Committee was founded in December 1902. The Coventry Borough Labour Party, which grew out of it and was established in 1906, expanded its influence so that by 1923 Coventry had returned its first Labour MP. The party was instrumental in establishing the Coventry Anti-apartheid Committee in 1960. The early records of the party were destroyed during the blitz on the city in 1940, and the surviving records mostly date from after the war.

European Confederation of Free Trade Unions

In 1969 the European Trade Union Secretariat (ETUS) adopted a new name, the European Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ECFTU). It was active in the area of code of conduct for companies investing in South Africa, the conduct of national and international trade unions towards South Africa and the application of the European Community Code of Conduct for multinational companies. In 1973 the ECFTU merged with the Trade Union Committee for the European Free Trade Area (EFTA-TUC) and continued as the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC).
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