Showing 673 results

Archival description
United States
Print preview View:

Address by President Nelson Mandela on receiving the Congressional Gold Medal

  • ZA COM MR-S-634
  • Item
  • 1998-09-23
  • Part of Speeches

On receiving the Congressional Gold Medal ; U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS DELIVERS REMARKS AT PRESENTATION OF CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT, NELSON MANDELA
23 September 1998

SPEAKERS: U.S. REPRESENTATIVE MAXINE WATERS (D-CA)

[*] WATERS: President Clinton, President Man

Mandela, Nelson Rolihlahla

Records of the Foreign Office: Export of Arms to South Africa: Internal Security Operations: Rivonia Sabotage Trial of ANC Leaders

These records fall under: Foreign Office: Political Departments: General Correspondence; Africa, West and Central (J): South Africa (JS) subseries.

Contains:
-The escape of Bob Hepple (telegram, 28 November 1963)
-Prison conditions with affidavits from Bernstein, Goldberg, Motsoaledi, Mbeki, Kathrada and Sisulu (report, 21 November 1963)
-Newspaper articles on the Rivonia trial (November and December 1963)
-Note from Mitford to the British Consulate General requesting that political trials that might seriously impact the Rivonia Trial to be closely monitored (5 December 1963)
-Visit by John Arnold Q.C. a leading conservative barrister in London (includes a summary of proceedings, 13 December 1963)
-Arrest, assault and torture of Isaac Tlale of the ANC at the hands of security police who wanted him to testify against the Rivonia accused. Police claimed to him that Joe Slovo bought Mandela and Sisulu with money from the communists (report/affidavit, no date)
-Report of John Arnold Q.C. at the International Commission of Jurists on his visit to South Africa and includes a comment that he believed the Rivonia trial judge was fair and partial (16 December 1963)
-Nelson Mandela's life sentence: reactions (1963)
-Foreign reaction to the Rivonia trial judgment and sentences
-Statement in parliament by H.F. Verwoerd (16 June 1964)
-Rivonia trial judgment (correspondence and press cuttings)
-Rivonia trial sentence (summary from press articles 1964)
-Question whether the British government should ask the South African government to reduce the life sentences handed down in the Rivonia trial (Correspondence, 26 June 1964)
-Libyan embassy in London will ask the UK secretary of state to intervene and have the Rivonia trial life sentences reduced (report, 15 June 1964)
-The U.S. state department will not ask for a reduction in the Rivonia trial (correspondence Internal British foreign office, (27 June 1964)
-Secretary of the state talking about the Rivonia (speech house of Commons, July 1964)
-The Canadian Ambassador asks that the Rivonia trial sentences be reduced (report, 22 July 1964)
-Rivonia trial accused decide not to appeal (report, 27 July 1964)
-The German government approaches South Africa about the Rivonia trial sentences (report, 2 September 1964)
-Book on Rivonia trial by Judge De Villiers (Report 24 September 1964)
-Death sentence in Rivonia trial "unlikely" (note, 4 June 1964)
-Upcoming judgement and sentence in the Rivonia trial (note , 2 June 1964)
-The Australian representative to South Africa has been instructed to register his government's concern over the Rivonia trial (note, 9 June 1964)
-U.K. should abstain in the vote on the Rivonia resolution by Ivory Coast and Morocco unless is amended (America will also abstain) (note, 10 June 1964)
-Verdicts in Rivonia Trial (telegram, 11 June 1964)
-Analysis of evidence at the Rivonia Trial (report, 10 June 1964)
-Decision to defer any attempt by the U.S. to get a reduction in Rivonia Trial sentences until the defence has lodged an appeal (note, 14 June 1964)
-Unsigned copy of the Rivonia trial judgement (15 June 1964)

UK Foreign Office

African Activist Archive

  • US AI002 MR-RT-140
  • Collection
  • 1950 - 1999
  • Part of Rivonia Trial

Gathered from various repositories and private sources to preserve records and memories of activism in the United States in support of the struggles of African peoples against colonialism, apartheid, and social injustice from the 1950s through the 1990s.

A search for Rivonia Trial material yields:
-Photographs of demonstrations outside the South African Consulate in New York protesting the outcome of the Rivonia Trial (from private collections and American Committee on Africa)
-Buttons: "Free Motsoaledi", "Free Kathrada" "Free Mandela", "Happy birthday Motsoaledi" (from Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa)

Untitled

Rivonia Trial, 1963-1964

This South African material at this repository was collected by Thomas Karis for "From Protest to Challenge" and is in the Karis-Gerhart Collection of South African Political Trials. It contains the following on the Rivonia Trial:
-MF-451 Neg. MF: Rivonia Sabotage Trial: Not an official transcript. File consists of defence attorney's detailed notes on transcript, analyses of evidence and exhibits. Also includes the indictment. 4 reels
-MF-2611 Neg. MF-966: The Rivonia Trial, J G Joffe and M Koff. Microfilm of typescript. 1 reel.
-MF-10791 reel 35 item 6: Rivonia: Operation Mayibuye: A Review of the Rivonia Trial, H H W de Villiers with a foreward by Francis Napier Broome.

Untitled

Mr. Mandela and Mr. FW de Klerk received the Gandhi, King, Ikeda Community Builders Prize. The Prize is given in recognition of current efforts toward building peace in our world’s communities; from the Gandhi Institute for Reconciliation.

Mandela and Mr FW de Klerk received the Gandhi, King, Ikeda Community Builders Prize. The Prize is given in recognition of current efforts toward building peace in our world’s communities; from the Gandhi Institute for Reconciliation

A. Philip Randolph

Mr A. Philip Randolph, an African American labour and civil rights activist, was a member of the Committee of Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), founded in 1952 to support the Defiance Campaign. He was also a member of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and headed the Committee on Conscience against Apartheid, formed by ACOA. He was very active in the End Loans campaigns.

Africa Fund : [Part 1]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

Africa Fund : [Part 2]

The Africa Fund was founded in 1966 by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA). They shared offices and staff but had separate boards and budgets. It supported health and educational projects of the liberations movements. It also supported the South African Council of Churches to aid political prisoners and their families. It researched American corporations and their ties with South Africa. It merged in 2001 with the Africa Policy Information Center (APIC) and ACOA to form Africa Action.

American Committee on Africa : [Part 2]

The American Committee on Africa (ACOA) was formed in 1953 to support the liberation struggle in Africa. It grew out of the ad-hoc organisation Americans for South African Resistance (AFSAR), set up to support the Defiance Campaign of the ANC in 1952. It started with an office in New York City and opened an office in Washington DC in 1967. The NYC office had a national focus and organised sanctions and divestment campaigns at universities, churches, states and cities. It merged in 2001 with Africa Fund (AF) and Africa Policy Information Centre (APIC) to form Africa Action.

Amnesty International USA

The AI-USA started in the early 1960s and has several offices in the country. It is an affiliate of AI- International Secretariat and bases its activities on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The campaigns concentrate on the rights of political prisoners and unfair trials, working towards the release of prisoners of conscience.

Association of Concerned Africa Scholars

ACAS was founded in 1977 at Michigan State University to provide an alternative analysis of Africa and US policy towards Africa. It developed communication and action networks between scholars in Africa and the USA. It mobilised support in the USA for anti-apartheid solidarity. It continues to work on current African issues.

Champaign-Urbana Coalition against Apartheid

This was a campus based group at the University of Illinois. It operated from 1964 till about 1991 and worked especially for divestment by the university, boycott and human rights campaigns. The organisation continued and broadened its work in the early 1990s and changed its name to the Champaign-Urbana Coalition on Africa.

Committee for Health in Southern Africa

CHISA was a specialist organisation, founded in 1984 and operating till 1995. This specialist organisation worked on health and related human rights issues in South Africa as well as the role of health professionals and organisations. It maintained contacts with NAMDA (National Medical and Dental Association), a progressive health organisation in South Africa). CHISA was also active in other countries in North America.

Dennis Brutus : [Part 2]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Dennis Brutus : [Part 3]

Dr Dennis Vincent Brutus was a Zimbabwean-born South African activist, educator, journalist and poet best known for his campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from the Olympic Games. His efforts eventually led to the country’s expulsion from the Games in 1970. Following 18 months on Robben Island and another year of house arrest, Brutus and his family were allowed to leave South Africa, settling in London in 1966. In 1970 he moved to the USA, and was granted political asylum in 1983. He was president of the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee (SAN-ROC).

Enuga Sreenivasulu Reddy : [Part 1]

ES Reddy was born in India and moved to the USA to study at New York University. He held several positions at the United Nations and a driving force behind the Special Committee against Apartheid (of which he was Secretary from 1963 -1965) and its Centre against Apartheid (of which he was Director from 1976-1983). He also served as Director of the UN Trust Fund for South Africa and the Educational and Training Programme for Southern Africa.
Results 1 to 100 of 673